Pile by the Bed reviews The Warehouse by Rob Hart - a new dystopian thriller that takes on Amazon and the American dream.

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Pile by the Bed reviews Lost Acre, the last volume in Andrew Caldecott's very English fantasy Rotherweird trilogy

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Pile by the Bed reviews Lady in the Lake by Laura Lippman, a timely historical crime novel that explores Baltimore in the 1960s.

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Pile by the Bed reviews Snake Island by Ben Hobson - a page-turning Australian rural crime thriller

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Pile by the Bed reviews Lapse by Sarah Thornton, an enjoyable debut that adds to the growing catalogue of Australian rural crime fiction.

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Pile by the Bed reviews See you at the Toxteth - a retrospective collection of the works by the Godfather of Australian crime fiction - Peter Corris

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Pile by the Bed reviews Shadows of the Short Days by Alexander Dan Vilhjalmsson - grimdark, urban fantasy based in Icelandic mythology.

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Pile by the Bed reviews The Ottoman Secret by Raymond Khoury an alternate history thriller that asks what if the Ottoman Empire sucessfully conquered Europe in the 17th Century.

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Pile by the Bed reviews and recommends Jade War by Fonda Lee, second book in the Green Bone trilogy.

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Pile by the Bed reviews This is Gomorrah a fictional thriller about the dark web by tech philosopher Tom Chatfield

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Pile by the Bed reviews Linda Grant's eighth novel - A Stranger City - exploring the consequences of Brexit-era nationalism on the rich multicultural traditions of London.

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Pile by the Bed reviews Velocity Weapon by Megan E O'Keefe, the start of an enjoyable, page-turning space opera series.

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Pile by the Bed reviews The Dangerous Crime a page-turning and thematically rich crime thriller by Deborah O'Connor

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Pile by the Bed reviews Rogue by AJ Betts, the conclusion to the tale started in last year's dystopian YA novel Hive.

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Pile by the Bed reviews Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff using pulp horror and science fiction tropes to explore racism in America in the 1950s.

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Pile by the Bed reviews Hexarchate Stories by Yoon Ha Lee - short stories and extras expanding on his Machineries of Empire universe.

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Pile by the Bed reviews the novel version of Pan's Labyrinth by Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke - a "stunning work of fantasy".

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Pile by the Bed reviews Fortune by Lenny Bartulin - "an original, vibrant and entertaining historical novel"

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Pile by the Bed reviews Shoot Through by JM Green the third, and possibly last, book in her series featuring accidental detective Stella Hardy

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Pile by the Bed reviews The October Man by Ben Aaronovitch a stand alone novella set in his Rivers of London universe

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The Silent Inheritance by Joy Dettman
Crime , Review / 14/03/2016

Joy Dettman delves into a world of crime in her latest novel. Over a wide cast of characters she manages to fit in a whole spectrum of crime and general meanness into a small space: from a serial killer through to a hit and run, perjury and drug dealing. The Silent Inheritance ranges across a large group of characters so it takes a while to get going. Sarah Carter, deaf since birth, is trying to get a promotion but is passed over for...

Fever City by Tim Baker
Crime , Historical , Review / 10/03/2016

There is nothing more certain than death, taxes and books about the assassination of JFK. This event had everything – sex, drugs, mafia, movie stars, the FBI, the CIA, communists. And to top it all off, as Tim Baker does not hesitate to point out in Fever City, it was an event that changed the course of America and world history. The shooting of JFK  has always been the motherload for conspiracy theorists but also for crime writers. ...

Emperor of the Eight Islands by Lian Hearn
Fantasy , Review / 06/03/2016

Lian Hearn returns to her best-selling faux-Japanese fantasy world in a new four book series being published in Australia in two volumes. Set three hundred years before her Tales of the Otori, The Tale of Shikanoko is pure sword and sorcery fantasy with a Japanese twist. As with her Otori series, the setting is not Japan, or even a Japanese version of ancient Japan, but it is a Japan-like world heavily based on the myths, legends and...

The Poison Artist by Jonathan Moore
Crime , Recommended , Review , Thriller / 06/03/2016

Many crime novels straddle the line between crime and horror. Serial killers, on the whole, are the stuff of nightmares and crime writers have been falling over themselves for some time to up the gore factor. While horror novels usually rely on some form of supernatural agency and do not necessarily have the neat resolution of the crime genre, the bloody results are often the same. And so it is with The Poison Artist – a crime novel ...

How to Set a Fire and Why by Jesse Ball
Literature , Recommended , Review / 06/03/2016

It is easy to compare any novel narrated by a disaffected American teenager with the seminal Catcher in the Rye. Holden Caulfield has become the archetypical American teen – intelligent, insightful and with plenty of promise but constantly fighting against a system which seeks to pigeon hole and repress. Lucia, the eighteen year-old narrator of How to Set a Fire and Why, fits into this mould but this is a very different tale and a ve...

Down Station by Simon Morden
Fantasy , Review / 06/03/2016

Doorways into magical lands are a venerable fantasy tradition going back centuries in English fiction. Think Alice in Wonderland or Peter Pan. In the Twentieth Century we had the seminal Narnia series and plenty of imitators followed. More recently we’ve even seen a modern deconstruction of that mythology in books like Lev Grossman’s Magician’s series. In this context, Simon Morden’s Down Station seems a little staid. The central ide...

The Midnight Watch by David Dyer

The sinking of the Titanic, now over one hundred years ago, is still one of the most famous disasters in history. So it is no wonder that it has been the subject of countless books and films. Given this, the question has to be whether there is the appetite for yet another novel exploring this incident. The answer, strongly given by David Dyer in his debut The Midnight Watch, is an unqualified yes. The Midnight Watch is not primarily ...

Fall by Candice Fox
Crime , Recommended / 23/01/2016

  Eden Archer, Australia’s answer to Dexter Morgan, and her damaged partner Frank Bennett are back at work in Fall, investigating a series of murders of women joggers. Underlying this investigation is another one by Frank’s lover (and former psychologist) Imogen, who solves cold cases in her spare time and is closing in on Eden’s true identity. There is plenty else going on in Fall, with Eden’s ex-crimelord father Hades having a...

Undermajordomo Minor by Patrick DeWitt
Fantasy , Literature , Review / 05/01/2016

Patrick deWitt has gone into fractured fairytale territory in his latest novel. Undermajordomo Minor, set somewhere in Europe, sometime in the nineteenth century comes complete with castles, dukes, battles, pickpockets, chambermaids and the titular majordomo. Lucien “Lucy” Minor needs to leave home. He lands himself a job as assistant to Olderclough, the majordomo  of the Castle von Aux. On arrival, Lucy finds that Olderclough’s prev...